Superstructures

Today's implant systems consist of a titanium screw that grows firmly together with the jawbone and a so-called structural element that is firmly screwed to the implant body. These new teeth anchored on the implants are called superstructures. The aim of this modern restoration is to completely replace the function and aesthetics of the lost teeth. Due to the individual circumstances of the patient, the restoration and the costs can be very different. A precise appraisal and assessment by specialist staff is essential.

Explanation of terms for superstructure

Superstructure (lat. Supra "above") is a collective term in dentistry for all parts that are attached to an implant as a dental prosthesis. The dental implant serves as an artificial tooth root and is the connection to anchor artificial crowns, bridge structures or implant-supported prostheses .

The prosthetic work with crowns and bridges as a superstructure is much more comfortable than with removable dentures and its aesthetics increase the patient's self-esteem.

In implantology, the superstructure is incorporated approximately three to six months after the tooth implantation and its healing. The connecting piece between the implant and the superstructure is the implant abutment.
 

Application areas

  • For single tooth restoration, in order to prevent the neighboring teeth from being crowned with a bridge.

  • To lengthen shortened rows of teeth.

  • To avoid removable dentures as there are few remaining teeth.

  • For toothless jaws to give the denture a better hold.

  • In poor anatomical conditions for the hold of conventional dentures - e.g. condition after a tumor resection.

  • For additional support if there is not enough anchoring available.

The most commonly used superstructures are:

The dentist decides on the basis of the individual conditions in the patient's mouth whether a crown or bridge is possible.
If the stump is still worth preserving, it can be provided with a crown. However, if there is a tooth gap, two abutment teeth are required for the bridge restoration. The restoration is provided by a bridge pontic, which is attached to the adjacent teeth with the help of crowns / bridge anchors.

The dentist decides on the basis of the individual conditions in the patient's mouth whether a crown or bridge is possible.
If the stump is still worth preserving, it can be provided with a crown. However, if there is a tooth gap, two abutment teeth are required for the bridge restoration. The restoration is provided by a bridge pontic, which is attached to the adjacent teeth with the help of crowns / bridge anchors.

The dentist decides on the basis of the individual conditions in the patient's mouth whether a crown or bridge is possible.
If the stump is still worth preserving, it can be provided with a crown. However, if there is a tooth gap, two abutment teeth are required for the bridge restoration. The restoration is provided by a bridge pontic, which is attached to the adjacent teeth with the help of crowns / bridge anchors.

The dentist decides on the basis of the individual conditions in the patient's mouth whether a crown or bridge is possible.
If the stump is still worth preserving, it can be provided with a crown. However, if there is a tooth gap, two abutment teeth are required for the bridge restoration. The restoration is provided by a bridge pontic, which is attached to the adjacent teeth with the help of crowns / bridge anchors.

Process reliability for superstructures thanks to the latest CAD / CAM technology